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Re[2]: [at-l] Cooking in any Tent?



     Remember a little stove history, folks. "Early" gasoline stoves were 
     generally designed in such a way that the heat shield Saunterer writes 
     of below was not necessary. Think of the early editions of Fletcher's 
     The Complete Walker -- Colin uses his Svea 123 or his Optimus 8R with 
     a piece of ensolite *foam* cut from an old sleeping pad. And it was 
     nothing for him to bring this arrangement into his (seldom used) tent 
     in inclement weather. Think too of the butane/propane stoves which 
     come *intended* to be hung up during use....
     
     This is not something which you could do with the 
     now-much-more-popular MSRs (and now even some Peak1 models) which have 
     the stove tapped directly off the fuel 
     bottle,*and*which*sit*much*closer*to*the*ground.
     
     BTW, it used to be that one mark of a "four season" tent was a zipped 
     half-moon in the floor, which could be opened up for cooking. Is that 
     still the case? Anybody got a catalog handy?


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: [at-l] Cooking in any Tent?
Author:  bullard@northnet.org at ima
Date:    8/12/99 9:11 AM


At 07:01 AM 8/12/99 -0400, Kenneth R. Knight wrote:
>You know I can't imagine using a stove in my Stephensons tent unless it 
>is fairly chilly outside (even if it is really OK to use an Esbit stove 
>in there). 
If the Esbit is like my British "Tommy Cooker" (which I understand it was 
copied from) there is NO WAY I'd ever use it in any tent. The flame is much 
too close to the surface it sits on and requires a heat shield under it to 
keep it from charring a wooden shelter floor. Your tent floor would never 
survive it and you might not either. Aside from the fire hazard I don't 
think the fumes from the fuel would be a good thing in such an enclosed 
space. Stoves belong outside or under a tarp with lots of breezes blowing 
through. I know, I know, some people do it and get away with it. Count 
yourselves *LUCKY*. It's not a good idea. I like to finish my hikes alive 
and without burns all over my body.
     
Saunterer
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